And then, you ask me whether I approve of violence. I mean, that just doesn’t make any sense at all… whether I approve of guns.

I grew up in Birmingham, Alabama!

Some very, very good friends of mine were killed by bombs! Bombs that were planted by racists. I remember from the time - I was very small - I remember the sound of bombs exploding across the street, our house shaking! I remember my father having to have guns at his disposal at all times because of that fact that any moment - someone - we might expect to be attacked.

The man who was in that time, in complete control of the city government, his name was Bill Connor. He would often get on the radio and make statements like - “Niggers have moved into an all white neighborhood, we better expect some bloodshed tonight,” and sure enough there would be blood shed.

After the four girls - one of them lived next door to me - I was very good friends of a sister of another one… My sister was very good friends with all three of them. My mother taught one of them in her class.

In fact, when the bombing occurred, one of the mothers of the young girl called my mother and said - “Can you take me down to the church and pick up Carol? We heard about the bombing and I don’t have my car.”

And they went down and what did they find? They found limbs and heads strewn all over the place.

And then after that, in my neighborhood, all the men organized themselves into an armed patrol. They had to take their guns and patrol our community every night because they did not want that to happen again. ❞ Angela Davis on Violence [x]

(Source: classicalallure, via oftheneptunes)

Timestamp: 1406753020
And then, you ask me whether I approve of violence. I mean, that just doesn’t make any sense at all… whether I approve of guns.

I grew up in Birmingham, Alabama!

Some very, very good friends of mine were killed by bombs! Bombs that were planted by racists. I remember from the time - I was very small - I remember the sound of bombs exploding across the street, our house shaking! I remember my father having to have guns at his disposal at all times because of that fact that any moment - someone - we might expect to be attacked.

The man who was in that time, in complete control of the city government, his name was Bill Connor. He would often get on the radio and make statements like - “Niggers have moved into an all white neighborhood, we better expect some bloodshed tonight,” and sure enough there would be blood shed.

After the four girls - one of them lived next door to me - I was very good friends of a sister of another one… My sister was very good friends with all three of them. My mother taught one of them in her class.

In fact, when the bombing occurred, one of the mothers of the young girl called my mother and said - “Can you take me down to the church and pick up Carol? We heard about the bombing and I don’t have my car.”

And they went down and what did they find? They found limbs and heads strewn all over the place.

And then after that, in my neighborhood, all the men organized themselves into an armed patrol. They had to take their guns and patrol our community every night because they did not want that to happen again. ❞ Angela Davis on Violence [x]

(Source: classicalallure, via oftheneptunes)

shwagerr:

mcelijahblack:

jamarcoaaronshaw:

beautifulxsavage:

hussieologist:

weloveblackgirls:

Can we have anything ?

This was so corny and off beat

😑

OMG.

oh god 

lol i cant.

(via christhepusher)

morenoluv:

detroitsabrina:

blackartdepot:

dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.

This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.

Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.

Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.

In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.

And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.

Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.

13 June – 25 August 2014
Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30)
Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)

Terrace Rooms, South Wing
Free admission

More events.

I would love to go see this exhibit.

Dapper Life is Art

This was a great exhibit!!!! Take the tub to embankment and walk……worth a see

(via selfloathing--narcissist)

Timestamp: 1406670729

morenoluv:

detroitsabrina:

blackartdepot:

dynamicafrica:

"Return of the Rudeboy" Exhibition at Somerset House.

This summer,from mid-June to mid-August, London’s Somerset House is highlighting one Jamaica’s most influential exports on British fashion, music and style.

Birthed on the streets of Kingston, Jamaica, the Rudeboy (or Rudie) came to represent the young rebels who wore distinctively sharp sartorial styles such as Mohair suits, thin ties and pork pie hats. Much of their identity was rooted in aesthetics but their style was also closely connected to the music movements of the time, notably American Jazz and R&B musicians.

Curated by prolific photographer and filmmaker for music’s most wanted Dean Chalkley and fashion-industry favourite creative director Harris Elliott, this interactive exhibition focuses on and highlights the origins of Rudeboy culture in Jamaica, as well as its presence in the United Kingdom through various subcultures, through a series of portraits, installations and set pieces. In the past year, Chalkley and Elliott have photographed over 60 sharply dressed individuals from across the UK, whether it be on the streets of Shoreditch or Savile Row, all of whom embody the essence of what it is to be a Rudeboy (or Rudie) in the 21st century, to document the life, style and attitude of this growing urban group.

In addition to these portraits, all of the individuals pictured have provided their signature playlist, which has been fused along with curators’ and collaborators’ choices, into a soundtrack to capture the spirit and soul of the Rudeboy, and a complimentary sonic addition to the visuals of the exhibition.

And if all that isn’t awesome already, to highlight the essence of grooming as part of the Rudeboy aesthetics, the space will host a pop-up ‘grooming station’ on Thursdays and Saturdays, from Saturday 21 June, where visitors can book appointments to get their hair cut or beard trimmed by a top Rudeboy barber.

Celebrating Rudeboy culture is important for several reasons. Not only is it one of the biggest movements that has largely shaped 20th century British identity, it also highlights some of the impact and contributions that have been made in Britain and the UK at large through the Jamaican diaspora.

13 June – 25 August 2014
Daily 10.00-18.00 (last entry 17.30)
Until 21.00 on Thursday 3 July (last entry 20.30)

Terrace Rooms, South Wing
Free admission

More events.

I would love to go see this exhibit.

Dapper Life is Art

This was a great exhibit!!!! Take the tub to embankment and walk……worth a see

(via selfloathing--narcissist)

eros-immortel:

LOL. G Shit.

(Source: 4gifs, via selfloathing--narcissist)

spikefuckingjonze:

anyone else noticing a trend here?

(via squid-in-a-party-hat)

Timestamp: 1406669175

spikefuckingjonze:

anyone else noticing a trend here?

(via squid-in-a-party-hat)

dianaross:

Mahogany, 1975

(via rock-my-boatey)

Timestamp: 1406668188

dianaross:

Mahogany, 1975

(via rock-my-boatey)

thechanelmuse:

Fav.

(Source: misterand)

lovelyandbrown:

jamaicanamazon:

Black Excellence.

come through, little black british brotha. come through.

(Source: lawdgevus, via eraikhoba)

Timestamp: 1406667128

lovelyandbrown:

jamaicanamazon:

Black Excellence.

come through, little black british brotha. come through.

(Source: lawdgevus, via eraikhoba)

(Source: afirahs, via dynastylnoire)

wherethefwereyou:

Matt Kemp and Chanel Iman for Gap’s Fall 2014 Campaign. 

(Source: iamangelsuri, via blackgirlsrpretty2)

Timestamp: 1406665572

wherethefwereyou:

Matt Kemp and Chanel Iman for Gap’s Fall 2014 Campaign. 

(Source: iamangelsuri, via blackgirlsrpretty2)